Tools & Technology

How Many Power Adapters Do You Need?

I discovered the extension cord pushed down the back of the dressing unit again. Dangling from the power cable that’s attached to the TV in our bedroom.

This is not good for the power cord, and it’s not good for the power adapter on the TV. Power cords aren’t designed to take the weight of objects – they’re designed to deliver power. Too much weight for too long and something breaks.

It struck me that not everyone thinks like this though. Most people are more immediate, more practical, they see a power cord, they plug it in, they see it’s ugly, they push it down the back of the dresser and they don’t consider the loading or the strain on the cord or the unit. And really, why should they?

Aren’t power cords just designed badly in the first place? Shouldn’t power cords automatically relieve strain too? Well probably, but designers like sleek lines and power adapters need to be standardised – which is potentially good news for Apple iPhone 15 users at least.

The user just keeps on using the thing because it’s there. Sometimes we look at an extension cord and go “woah, perhaps we need to reevaluate” but most of the time we’re happy to just buy it and use it.

DevOps tools are just like extension cords. You’ve bought loads of them and they’re all plugged into each other and they all cause strain on your organisation.

You’re afraid of reducing that load because everyone says they’re all vital. But you’re missing an opportunity to free-up time, free-up cash for more devs, more products and more innovation.

It’s time for you to review your DevOps tools and win some time and money back.

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